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Anaphylaxis: how to make a swift diagnosis, treat, monitor and advise patients

What nurses should know about anaphylaxis, a systemic allergic reaction and medical emergency
Anaphylaxis

What nurses need to know about anaphylaxis, a systemic allergic reaction and medical emergency

  • Red flag symptoms are skin or mucosal changes such as redness, rash or hives, or swelling of the tongue, lips and eyes
  • The first line of treatment is intramuscular adrenaline, which should be given as swiftly as possible
  • Pulse, blood pressure, ECG and pulse oximetry must be monitored to assess patient’s response to adrenaline

Anaphylaxis is an extremely serious allergic reaction that sends an increasing number of patients to hospital with potentially life-threatening conditions.

Hospital admissions in the UK for food-related anaphylaxis increased by almost 6%

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