My job

60 seconds with nurse educator Sue McBean

Sue McBean may be an experienced author, teacher, activist, researcher and nurse, but she is still keen to carry on learning.

Sue McBean may be an experienced author, teacher, activist, researcher and nurse, but she is still keen to carry on learning 

Sue McBean

A qualified nurse, district nurse and health visitor, Sue McBean prioritises health inequalities and primary health care in her work. She has a master’s degree in health education and recently retired from full-time academic work. 

What are your main work responsibilities?  

To generate discussion on issues related to nursing practice, education and continuing professional development as an author, researcher and academic. I speak at conferences and review articles submitted for publication. 

Who are your clients/patients?

For three decades my clients tended to be students and qualified nurses. In future, I see my client group becoming all health and social care staff and students. 

What do you love about your job? 

Communicating with colleagues. I am as enthusiastic about nursing and improving practice as ever and I still have much to learn and many questions to help answer. 

What do you find most difficult? 

When judgement is passed on ‘unhealthy behaviour choices’ – I question the validity of those three words – especially when adverse life circumstances make change almost impossible.  

What is your top priority for work?

To ensure that my best ideas for improving healthcare are published before I develop signs of intellectual decline. 

How have you developed your skills? 

I gained my love of teaching from my nurse tutor, Margaret Phillips, who made all of us in our small group teach each other. I learned how to teach at the RCN. 

What was your formative career experience? 

During my 3 years as a senior lecturer at the RCN, I rubbed shoulders with famous names in nursing and shared an office with Mary Watkins (now dame) and Kim Manley (now professor). 

What will be your next career move? 

Writing my first book, Essays on Health and Wellbeing. 

What career advice would you give your younger self? 

Publish more and believe in your achievements. Keep up the clinical practice and stay ahead. 

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