Newly qualified nurses

A difficult choice proved the right one for one newly qualified mental health nurse

When Deborah Ayodele had to a choice between moving abroad or training as a mental health nurse, she chose the latter. Despite some challenges along the way, she has no regrets about her decision as she embarks on her new career. 
Road to Success

When Deborah Ayodele had a choice between moving abroad or training as a mental health nurse, she chose the latter. Despite some challenges along the way, she has no regrets about her decision as she embarks on her new career

I graduated as a mental health nurse this summer, and this month I start work in a psychiatric decision unit as a qualified nurse.

Looking back on the past three years, and reflecting on the journey I have taken throughout my degree, reminds of a poem I often recite to myself: The Road Not Taken by Robert Frost.

Two roads

Three years ago, there were two roads I could take: one was to pursue new opportunities abroad, the other was to embark on my mental health nursing degree at King's College London.

I wanted to travel both roads

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When Deborah Ayodele had a choice between moving abroad or training as a mental health nurse, she chose the latter. Despite some challenges along the way, she has no regrets about her decision as she embarks on her new career 


Picture: iStock

I graduated as a mental health nurse this summer, and this month I start work in a psychiatric decision unit as a qualified nurse. 

Looking back on the past three years, and reflecting on the journey I have taken throughout my degree, reminds of a poem I often recite to myself: The Road Not Taken by Robert Frost. 

Two roads

Three years ago, there were two roads I could take: one was to pursue new opportunities abroad, the other was to embark on my mental health nursing degree at King's College London. 

I wanted to travel both roads but could only choose one. Today, I am proud to say I chose to do my nursing degree, and that road has been successfully travelled. 

I have come a long way in my three years of training, and am grateful for the challenges I have faced along the way that have forced me to grow.  

My training has not been easy, but it has equipped me with the skills to be the best mental health nurse I can be. From the mentors who saw more in me than I saw in myself and the university lecturers who believed in me, to the friends I made on the journey and the patients who were kind enough to let me into their worlds. 

Learning doesn't stop

My course may have finished but the learning doesn’t stop in a career like this, not when you have people’s lives in your hands every day.  

But this is what I love; I am excited to learn and develop more as a qualified nurse so that I can be an effective tool in improving the lives of others. I love that I am in an ever-changing career, and that I have the opportunity to make an impact on the lives of the people I meet. 

So, this is where the student badge comes off and the qualified nurse badge goes on. I am aware of the responsibilities that will come, and know that the career I have chosen is not an easy one. 

We all know that the nursing profession is under a tremendous amount of strain, but there are experienced nurses out there, and new nurses like me, who make the decision to carry on. And that is because we care. 

The final verse of The Road Not Taken describes the end of my tale better than I ever could.

‘I shall be telling this with a sigh
Somewhere ages and ages hence:
Two roads diverged in a wood, and I –
I took the one less travelled by,
And that has made all the difference.’
 

Deborah Ayodele graduated from King’s College London with first class honours in August 2017 

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