Clinical placements

Difficult placement taught me how to challenge prejudice in practice

During a clinical placement, I realised some staff had judgemental attitudes and beliefs that could cause offence.

During a clinical placement, I realised some staff had judgemental attitudes and beliefs that could cause offence.

These staff members frequently used homophobic slurs to make ‘jokes’ about colleagues and, on one occasion, a patient.

'Wrong' homour

They vocalised views that those who identified as lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans or questioning (LGBTQ) were ‘wrong’, or deliberately doing so to stand out from others. They made comments about how LGBTQ people could be cured of their ‘affliction’, in the same way medical staff might cure a disease – a view many find offensive.

Their humour was based around suggesting that colleagues were gay – which was meant as an insult. It was shocking to witness in a professional environment.

Concealing identity

I felt under considerable pressure to keep my own sexual orientation anonymous, for fear of prejudice, as well as

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