Reflective accounts

Reflective account – In-hospital resuscitation

A CPD article improved Abby Morrow-Barnes’ knowledge of how to recognise and respond to adults in cardiac arrest.
Resuscitation

A CPD article improved Abby Morrow-Barnes knowledge of how to recognise and respond to adults in cardiac arrest.

What was the nature of the CPD activity, practice-related feedback and/or event and/or experience in your practice?

This CPD article explored the Resuscitation Council UK guidelines for in-hospital resuscitation and considered their application to practice.

What did you learn from the CPD activity, feedback and/or event and/or experience in your practice?

The article listed the resuscitation equipment required in emergency situations, which reminded me what each piece of equipment is for and how to use it.

It included the in-hospital resuscitation algorithm, which outlined the steps that must be taken when a patient has collapsed or is unwell. I am now aware of the immediate actions required in these situations.

I have learned about the different components of

...

A CPD article improved Abby Morrow-Barnes’ knowledge of how to recognise and respond to adults in cardiac arrest.

What was the nature of the CPD activity, practice-related feedback and/or event and/or experience in your practice?

This CPD article explored the Resuscitation Council UK guidelines for in-hospital resuscitation and considered their application to practice.


Picture: iStock

What did you learn from the CPD activity, feedback and/or event and/or experience in your practice?

The article listed the resuscitation equipment required in emergency situations, which reminded me what each piece of equipment is for and how to use it.

It included the in-hospital resuscitation algorithm, which outlined the steps that must be taken when a patient has collapsed or is unwell. I am now aware of the immediate actions required in these situations.

I have learned about the different components of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and the importance of defibrillation in improving patient outcomes. However, the article emphasised that the survival rate for cardiac arrest remains low, even for patients who are in hospital.

The article discussed the use of the ABCDE (airway, breathing, circulation, disability, exposure) approach to assessing patients. I found it useful to revisit this information, particularly since I have recently completed my Intermediate Life Support training.

I was interested to read that when undertaking chest compressions for a patient in bed, pressure-relieving mattresses should be deflated because they can make it difficult to achieve full chest recoil.

How did you change or improve your practice?

After reading this article, I am more confident in carrying out patient assessments and following the steps outlined in the resuscitation algorithm. I am now aware that the reduction in cerebral blood flow at the onset of cardiac arrest can result in seizure-like activity, which is often mistaken for epilepsy.

I will consider this possibility when I am assessing patients.

If the patient is lying on a pressure-relieving mattress I will deflate it because this may improve the effectiveness of chest compressions. I also intend to check whether there is any research in relation to inflated and deflated air mattresses and the outcome of CPR.

I plan to undertake some further reading in relation to the low survival rate following cardiac arrest, and the factors that might influence this. I would also like to improve my intubation skills, to ensure I am competent and confident to assist in situations where intubation is necessary.

How is this relevant to the Code? Select one or more themes: Prioritise people, Practise effectively, Preserve safety, Promote professionalism and trust

One of the themes of the Code is prioritising people. When a patient is in cardiac arrest, it is crucial to prioritise their care and safety. It is also important for nurses to consider the other people in the area, as well as the patient’s relatives.

The Code emphasises the importance of preserving safety. The ability to complete an ABCDE assessment and to recognise the signs that a patient is deteriorating mean I can raise any concerns immediately, potentially improving patient outcomes.

The Code states nurses must work within the limits of their competence and take action when emergencies arise to preserve safety.

Nurses must also practise effectively in emergency situations, by working as a team, communicating concisely, and listening to the resuscitation team leader.

Abby Morrow-Barnes is a staff nurse at Warwick Hospital, Warwickshire


This reflective account is based on NS857 Simpson E (2016) In-hospital resuscitation: recognising and responding to adults in cardiac arrest. Nursing Standard. 30, 51, 50-61. The questions are the same as those on the NMC templates that UK nurses and midwives must use for revalidation.

Write your own reflective account

You can gain a certificate of learning by reading a Nursing Standard CPD article and writing a reflective account. To write a reflective account for Nursing Standard, use the NMC reflective accounts form

Complete the four questions about the CPD article you have just read, writing about 800 words in total. Details of how to submit your reflective account are available here

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