Your views

Readers’ panel: Is the NMC right to regulate the nursing associate role?

The Nursing and Midwifery Council recently confirmed that it will be the regulator for the new nursing associate role. Nursing Standard asks its readers’ panellists if they agree with the move. 
Regulations_Compliance_Alamy_Tile.jpg

The Nursing and Midwifery Council recently confirmed that it will be the regulator for the new nursing associate role. Nursing Standard asks its readers panellists if they agree with the move

Stephanie Cumming is a practice nurse in Warwickshire

Absolutely. I am a firm believer that all healthcare roles providing direct clinical care, from healthcare assistant to registered nurse, should be regulated in the interests of public safety. Although it could be argued that regulating nursing associates promotes a cheap replacement for registered nurses, and the NMC is already struggling with a backlog of fitness to practise cases, it is still the right body to regulate nursing associates.

Drew Payne is a community staff nurse in north London @drew_london

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The Nursing and Midwifery Council recently confirmed that it will be the regulator for the new nursing associate role. Nursing Standard asks its readers’ panellists if they agree with the move


Regulation of the new nursing associate role will be the responsibility of the NMC. Picture: Alamy

Stephanie Cumming is a practice nurse in Warwickshire 

Stephanie Cumming

Absolutely. I am a firm believer that all healthcare roles providing direct clinical care, from healthcare assistant to registered nurse, should be regulated in the interests of public safety. Although it could be argued that regulating nursing associates promotes a cheap replacement for registered nurses, and the NMC is already struggling with a backlog of fitness to practise cases, it is still the right body to regulate nursing associates.

 

Drew Payne is a community staff nurse in north London  
@drew_london 

Drew Payne

The NMC is barely fulfilling its current role, but unfortunately it is the only appropriate organisation to regulate nursing associates. It is still a nursing role and it would be dangerous to have two different regulators but the NMC will need a major overhaul first. It must become a much more proactive organisation and this new responsibility should not be funded by raising our fees. We need to remain vigilant as the NMC has broken its word on fees before.

 

Rachel Kent is a mental health nurse in London 

Rachel Kent

As nursing’s regulatory body, the NMC is best placed to identify the distinction between what a qualified nurse is expected to do and what a nursing associate is permitted to do and the responsibilities of each. The NMC knows what nurses do and what ‘skills gap’ nursing associates have been introduced to fill, and it is important that nursing associates are regulated. I wonder, however, if they will be expected to pay a fee to the NMC in the same way as nurses?

 

Daniel Athey is a staff nurse on an acute medical unit in Sheffield 
@danjathey 

Daniel Athey

The NMC seems as fit as any other body to regulate the nursing associate role; it already regulates nurses and there is likely to be a lot of crossover with this new position. But asking nurses how they feel about the body that they pay to sanction and reprimand them is akin to asking turkeys what they think about Christmas. I don’t doubt the service it provides is important, but I resent the hoops it makes me jump through to practise.


Readers’ panel members give their views in a personal capacity only 

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