Expert advice

Legal advice: should I comply with a request to write a report on an incident I was not involved in?

If you are asked to write a report on an incident which occured when you were not there, present the facts clearly, ensure it is based on the evidence provided and seek advice from a trade union representative if necessary, says legal expert Marc Cornock. 
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If you are asked to write a report on an incident which occured when you were not there, present the facts clearly, ensure it is based on the evidence available and seek advice from a trade union representative if necessary, says legal expert Marc Cornock

There are many instances where someone could be asked to write a report on an incident they were not directly involved in. This could be to obtain an objective overview of the incident or, as a manager of a unit, you may need to draw together the views of a number of different people.

The first thing you need to highlight in the report is your position in relation to the incident, and the fact that you were not

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