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Nurse leader: funding for specialist qualification for district nurses needed

NHS chief executive Simon Stevens’ vision for nurse-led integrated services in the community must be backed by resources and CPD funding, says Crystal Oldman. 
crystal

NHS chief executive Simon Stevens vision for nurse-led integrated services in the community must be backed by resources and CPD funding for district nurses, says Crystal Oldman.

At last months Queens Nursing Institute (QNI) annual conference at the Royal College of General Practitioners in London, NHS England chief executive Simon Stevens spoke about his aspiration for the NHS to become a Neighbourhood Health Service, as well as a national one.

His ambition is to see integrated services that support people to maximise their health potential, and to be cared for at home when safe, with nurses leading the way.

While this vision is backed by the QNI, to deliver it we need more resources in the community, and an urgent review of the funding available for essential specialist qualifications for district nurses.

Right nurse, right skills

The QNI has been campaigning for the

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NHS chief executive Simon Stevens’ vision for nurse-led integrated services in the community must be backed by resources and CPD funding for district nurses, says Crystal Oldman. 

At last month’s Queen’s Nursing Institute (QNI) annual conference at the Royal College of General Practitioners in London, NHS England chief executive Simon Stevens spoke about his aspiration for the NHS to become a ‘Neighbourhood Health Service’, as well as a national one. 

His ambition is to see integrated services that support people to maximise their health potential, and to be cared for at home when safe, with nurses leading the way. 

While this vision is backed by the QNI, to deliver it we need more resources in the community, and an urgent review of the funding available for essential specialist qualifications for district nurses. 

Right nurse, right skills 

The QNI has been campaigning for the ‘right nurse with the right skills’ to support the transition of care into peoples’ homes since 2012. 

QNI reports on voluntary standards for education and the specialist practitioner qualification, published last year, confirm the importance of professional qualifications for district nurses, and the difference these can make to patients, families and carers. 

But as Council of Deans of Health chair Dame Jessica Corner reminded conference delegates, continuing professional development (CPD) budgets for nurses are being cut drastically. 

Professor Corner criticised the plans, which she said came ‘without warning and [with] little evidence of strategic planning at a national level.’  

A doctor would not be placed in the community as a General Practitioner without three years of funded education and development, so why is it acceptable to place nurses in charge of a district nursing service without funding the appropriate professional qualification?


About the author 

Crystal Oldman Crystal Oldman is chief executive of the Queen’s Nursing Institute 

The QNI backs RCNi’s #1hour2empower campaign, urging employers to guarantee one hour’s protected time a month for nurses to ensure they achieve the required 35 CPD hours in each 3-year revalidation cycle.

 

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