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Jane Bates: toilets are no place for resuscitating patients

If you are going to pass out, please do it somewhere spacious, says Jane Bates. 
Toilet_door-iStock.jpg

If you are going to pass out, please do it somewhere spacious, says Jane Bates

Patients are given all kinds of information when introduced to hospital facilities. Maps, parking provisions you name it.

I would like to insert another little nugget that has so far been overlooked. That is, dear patients, do not go to the loo if you feel you are going to keel over.

When you feel wobbly and unwell, it is quite understandable to head to the lavatory as various bodily functions may start to go haywire. But if you do collapse, you are less likely to be discovered immediately if you are in the ladies or the gents. Even worse if

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If you are going to pass out, please do it somewhere spacious, says Jane Bates 


Patients need to know that athough it's understandable to want to head to the loo
when feeling unwell, staff are less likely to find them. Picture: iStock

Patients are given all kinds of information when introduced to hospital facilities. Maps, parking provisions – you name it. 

I would like to insert another little nugget that has so far been overlooked. That is, dear patients, do not go to the loo if you feel you are going to keel over. 

When you feel wobbly and unwell, it is quite understandable to head to the lavatory as various bodily functions may start to go haywire. But if you do collapse, you are less likely to be discovered immediately if you are in the ladies or the gents. Even worse if you lock the door. 

No space 

Staff will have a nightmare trying to get in the cubicle, and bringing you around will be a squash even for one person. With their bottom lodged against the cistern and their ear on the lavatory seat, making an assessment of your condition will not be straightforward. As for fitting in medical equipment, there is barely room for a thermometer. 

Do not be misled into assuming those roomier loos for the disabled make it any easier. Every move of your potential resuscitator will set off the automatic dryer, introducing a farcical element, and because of the hand basin, mobility aids and extra furniture, staff will be impeded just as much. 

More importantly, there are more items to crack your head on as you fall. So, dear patients, for your own safety, please pass out somewhere spacious and public.

Thank you for your cooperation. 


About the author 

Jane Bates

 

 

 

Jane Bates is an ophthalmic nurse in Hampshire 

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