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Crystal Oldman: Helping community nurses get back on their feet

As the QNI celebrates its 130th anniversary, chief executive Crystal Oldman explains how the organisation is supporting community nurses and helping combat social isolation among retired Queen’s Nurses.

As the QNI celebrates its 130th anniversary, chief executive Crystal Oldman explains how the organisation is supporting community nurses and helping combat social isolation among retired Queen’s Nurses 


The QNI also offers support to retired Queen’s Nurses who are living alone. Picture: iStock

This year the Queen’s Nursing Institute celebrates its 130th anniversary, and we are as relevant today as when we were established in 1887. 

We continue to set standards of education and deliver training for nurses working in the community, influence policy and support innovation, and challenge the status quo. 

One part of our work that is less well known is the support we provide for community nurses who are in financial trouble through adverse life events, such as marriage breakdown or serious illness. 

Keeping in Touch

The financial and pastoral support we provide changes lives, enabling many nurses to return to the workforce. Their compelling and emotional stories demonstrate that, with a little help, nurses can get back on their feet and back to caring for their patients.

The QNI also offers support to retired Queen’s Nurses (QNs) who are socially isolated and housebound. Through our Keeping in Touch (KIT) programme, Queen’s Nurse volunteers make a weekly phone call to retired QNs, developing supportive relationships founded on common understanding, interest and commitment to community nursing. 

Many of our older retired QNs have no partner or family, and the KIT service has become a lifeline to many. We hope to expand the number we support to combat the loneliness felt by so many older people in today’s society.

Our anniversary appeal is for all the nurses who turn to the QNI for their support, for those in a life crisis or who are lonely. As well as continuing to meet the growing demand for our services, we want to honour the professionals who have cared and continue to care for others.


Crystal Oldman

 

 

 

Crystal Oldman is chief executive of the Queen’s Nursing Institute 

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