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US nurses must ‘heal divisions’ in wake of Donald Trump election victory

Nurses in the US must help to unite the country – and ensure healthcare for all – after the shock election result.
trump

Nurses in the US must help to unite the country and ensure healthcare for all after the shock presidential election result.

Nursing unions in America and international leaders said it was time to put aside political differences and work with the new administration to provide affordable healthcare for all Americans.

The two largest nursing unions in the US, the American Nurses Association and National Nurses United, issued statements after Donald Trump beat Hillary Clinton to be elected the 45th US President.

Above politics

The election result, which also saw the Republicans take firm control of the US Senate and House, caused shockwaves across the world following a bitterly-fought campaign that also divided nurses.

ANA

Nurses in the US must help to unite the country – and ensure healthcare for all – after the shock presidential election result.


The election result, which also saw the Republicans take firm control of the US Senate and House,
caused shockwaves across the world. Picture: iStock

Nursing unions in America and international leaders said it was time to put aside political differences and work with the new administration to provide affordable healthcare for all Americans.

The two largest nursing unions in the US, the American Nurses Association and National Nurses United, issued statements after Donald Trump beat Hillary Clinton to be elected the 45th US President.

‘Above politics’

The election result, which also saw the Republicans take firm control of the US Senate and House, caused shockwaves across the world following a bitterly-fought campaign that also divided nurses.

ANA president Pamela F. Cipriano said: ‘As President-elect Trump looks to improve America’s healthcare system, we are ready to work with his administration to advance healthcare that is accessible, affordable, equitable, integrated and innovative.

‘This new administration also has an opportunity to unite the country around a shared vision that puts protecting and promoting quality healthcare for all Americans above partisan politics.’

Repealing Obamacare 

The ANA, which represents 3.4million registered nurses in the US, had endorsed Mrs Clinton for president.

During the campaign, Mr Trump repeatedly said he would repeal Obamacare, labelling it ‘a disaster’. The Affordable Care Act – known as Obamacare – was introduced by President Barack Obama in 2010 to provide affordable health insurance to all Americans. Since the election, congressional Republicans have repeated the vow to repeal it.

In a statement, the NNU said that if Senator Bernie Sanders had been the Democrat candidate instead of Mrs Clinton, there would have been a very different result.

Working people 

It said now was the time to ‘fight for an economy that prioritizes working people, not global corporations, a healthcare system that is truly universal with effective cost controls through an improved Medicare for all, for comprehensive climate action, not half steps, and that secures the rights of all of our diverse nation’.

Meanwhile, Howard Catton, director, nursing and health policy at the International Council of nurses, tweeted: ‘American nurses now have a huge role to play in healing division, supporting unity and ensuring healthcare for all’.

Also on Twitter, Nurse4Trump thanked her 25,000 followers who ‘worked so diligently to bring this victory’.

Controversy 

But registered renal nurse Agnes Mahendran said it made her ‘sick’ to see how many nurses say they voted for Mr Trump.

The President-elect caused controversy with many of his opinions, including his opposition to abortion – except in cases of rape or incest, or where the mother’s life is endangered.

Policies outlined in Mr Trump’s healthcare position included:

  • WorkIing with Congress to create a patient-centered health care system that promotes choice, quality, and affordability.

  • Allow people to purchase insurance across state lines, in all 50 states, creating a dynamic market.

  • Grants so that local leaders can design innovative Medicaid programs that will better serve their low-income citizens.

Meanwhile, voters in California also approved the reform of laws to allow marijuana for recreational use.

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