News

Trust agrees to invest £2.6 million in keeping wards safely staffed

Following review, East Midlands trust decides to fund recruitment of nurses and support staff
Picture of signboard welcoming visitors to Lincoln County Hospital

Following review, United Lincolnshire Hospitals NHS Trust decides to fund recruitment of more nurses and support staff

An East Midlands trust is to spend £2.6 million expanding its nursing workforce to keep hospital wards safely staffed.

The investment will pay for an additional 25 full-time equivalent nurses and midwives at United Lincolnshire Hospitals NHS Trust (ULHT). It will also fund an extra 57 healthcare support workers at the trust.

Director of nursing Karen Dunderdale said the funding would also be used to retain nurses by providing improved support in the workplace.

  • RELATED:

Following review, United Lincolnshire Hospitals NHS Trust decides to fund recruitment of more nurses and support staff

Picture of signboard welcoming visitors to Lincoln County Hospital
Picture: Alamy

An East Midlands trust is to spend £2.6 million expanding its nursing workforce to keep hospital wards safely staffed.

The investment will pay for an additional 25 full-time equivalent nurses and midwives at United Lincolnshire Hospitals NHS Trust (ULHT). It will also fund an extra 57 healthcare support workers at the trust.

Director of nursing Karen Dunderdale said the funding would also be used to retain nurses by providing improved support in the workplace.

‘This is about ensuring that our nursing and midwifery establishments and shift arrangements deliver the best possible quality of care to our patients, while making sure we use our resources efficiently,’ Dr Dunderdale said.

‘We know that having permanent staffing in place, rather than using lots of agency staff, is best for patients and for the trust. It just makes sense.’

Recruitment of more nurses may help reduce amount the trust spends on agency staff

From July to August this year the trust undertook a nurse establishment review of its workforce across all wards of its four hospitals, looking at how many registered nurses, midwives and healthcare support workers were employed on each.

It found that despite ‘significant’ agency spend in August, the wards were short of 42 full-time registered nurses. To counter this, the review recommended increased spend on nursing recruitment. The additional funding was approved at a board meeting on 2 November.

It is hoped the recruitment of more nurses will also help reduce the amount the trust spends on agency staff to fill gaps when wards are understaffed.

Dr Dunderdale added: ‘We carried out our establishment review so we could be assured that the nursing and midwifery staffing levels across our wards continue to be appropriate and sufficient, in light of the recent pandemic.’


In other news

Sign up to continue reading for FREE

OR

Unlock full access to RCNi Plus today

Save over 50% on your first three months:

  • Customisable clinical dashboard featuring 200+ topics
  • Unlimited online access to all 10 RCNi Journals including Nursing Standard
  • RCNi Learning featuring 180+ RCN accredited learning modules
  • NMC-compliant RCNi Portfolio to build evidence for revalidation
  • Personalised newsletters tailored to your interests

This article is not available as part of an institutional subscription. Why is this?

Jobs