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Thousands expected to join NHS pay protests

Protesters are demanding an early pay rise following workforce’s COVID-19 efforts
Image showing money. Protesters are demanding an early pay rise following workforce’s COVID-19 efforts

Protesters are demanding an early pay rise following workforces COVID-19 efforts

Thousands of nurses and other NHS staff are expected to join protests this weekend calling for a pay rise.

A socially-distanced demonstration is due to take place in London on Saturday morning, while other such protests will also take place in other towns and cities in the UK.

They have been organised by the NHS Workers Say No Facebook group, which is calling for a 15% pay rise for staff by the end of the year.

Unions give support to members who take part

Nurse Anthony Johnson, lead organiser for Nurses United said: 'This is a pivotal moment in nursing.

'I have been really proud to be able to support so many new people to become active and take

Protesters are demanding an early pay rise following workforce’s COVID-19 efforts


Picture: iStock

Thousands of nurses and other NHS staff are expected to join protests this weekend calling for a pay rise.

A socially-distanced demonstration is due to take place in London on Saturday morning, while other such protests will also take place in other towns and cities in the UK.

They have been organised by the NHS Workers Say No Facebook group, which is calling for a 15% pay rise for staff by the end of the year.

Unions give support to members who take part 

Nurse Anthony Johnson, lead organiser for Nurses United said: 'This is a pivotal moment in nursing.

'I have been really proud to be able to support so many new people to become active and take action.'

The union Unite, which has 100,000 members in the health service, said it is supporting those who wish to attend the socially-distanced protests so the government can see the depth of discontent and frustration among NHS staff.


Dame Donna Kinnair: ‘I would always support
members fighting for fair pay and conditions’

RCN chief executive Dame Donna Kinnair said of the events: ‘While not college events, I would always support members playing an active role in fighting for fair pay and conditions for nursing staff.

‘As health professionals, I am confident nursing staff taking part in the demonstrations will follow COVID-19 guidelines.’

NHS nurses and other staff on Agenda for Change contracts are in the final year of a three-year pay deal due to expire in April 2021. But health unions say they want to see an early pay rise in a year where COVID-19 has increased the burden on an already strained workforce.

Pay discussions should be brought forward, says RCN chief

The government did not commit to an early pay rise for all NHS staff in July, when wage increases for 900,000 public sector workers were announced.

Professor Kinnair added: ‘The government must listen to the strength of feeling in the nursing workforce and among the wider public and bring forward these pay discussions.  

‘For the country to be able to recruit and retain nursing staff, they must receive fair pay for the professional work they do, which is increasingly complex.’

Protesters send message that ‘clapping won’t pay our bills’

This weekend’s protests come after hundreds of NHS staff marched to Downing Street on 29 July demanding an immediate pay rise.

They made their way to Whitehall carrying banners that said ‘Clapping won’t pay my bills’ and ‘We helped you survive, now help us survive’.

After the Downing Street protest in July, a spokesperson for the Department of Health and Social Care said it was grateful for the hard work and dedication of the NHS and social care workforce during the pandemic, adding: ‘We will continue to ensure all staff are rewarded fairly.’


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