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Technician who makes fake wounds for nursing students earns 'scientist' title

A woman who creates fake wounds, scars and burns to help nursing students prepare for the real thing has been recognised as a scientist by the Association for Simulated Practice in Healthcare.
wound

A university technician who mocks up wounds, scars and burns to help nursing students ready themselves for tasks they face on wards has been recognised for her work.

A fake arm gash.

Bucks New University simulation and skills facilities team leader Samantha McCormack has mastered the art of moulage, the skill of creating mock, and often gorily realistic, injuries for training purposes.

'I use my moulage skills to apply wounds, scars and burns to volunteers,' explained Ms McCormack.

Light-bulb moment

'It's much better for students to have a reaction with a volunteer than to risk offending actual patients.'

Thanks to her work, Ms McCormack has become the first simulation technician to be awarded specialist registered scientist recognition by the Association for Simulated Practice in Healthcare.

She said she had a light-bulb moment when a lecturer told students to imagine a wound

A university technician who mocks up wounds, scars and burns to help nursing students ready themselves for tasks they face on wards has been recognised for her work.

fake
A fake arm gash.

Bucks New University simulation and skills facilities team leader Samantha McCormack has mastered the art of moulage, the skill of creating mock, and often gorily realistic, injuries for training purposes.

'I use my moulage skills to apply wounds, scars and burns to volunteers,' explained Ms McCormack.

Light-bulb moment

'It's much better for students to have a reaction with a volunteer than to risk offending actual patients.'

Thanks to her work, Ms McCormack has become the first simulation technician to be awarded specialist registered scientist recognition by the Association for Simulated Practice in Healthcare.

She said she had a light-bulb moment when a lecturer told students to imagine a wound on a simulation mannequin.

Casualty makeup

She said: 'I thought there had to be a more effective form of learning experience than just asking them to use their imaginations.

'I researched the available training, submitted a business case and secured funding from the university to complete a casualty makeup course.

Dean of the university's faculty of society and health Sue West said: 'We are very proud of Sam's achievement. She has made a real difference in developing the confidence of our nursing students and the work of the simulation and skills team.'


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