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Single people cope less well with bowel cancer

Being single or living in a deprived area makes it twice as hard to cope with bowel cancer, research shows.
bowel

Being single or living in a deprived area makes it twice as hard to cope with bowel cancer, research shows

Bowel cancer patients who are single are twice as likely to have little or no confidence in dealing with their condition compared with those who are married or living with a partner (13% compared with 6%), the largest study of its kind has found.

It said patients living in the most deprived areas are also twice as likely to have little or no confidence (12%) in managing their cancer compared with those in the most affluent areas (6%).

One in ten

One in 10 people (9%) with bowel cancer had little or no confidence in managing their illness when they were diagnosed.

...

Being single or living in a deprived area makes it twice as hard to cope with bowel cancer, research shows

bowel
Lack of confidence makes it harder to stop pain or fatigue
intefering with everyday life. Picture: iStock

Bowel cancer patients who are single are twice as likely to have little or no confidence in dealing with their condition compared with those who are married or living with a partner (13% compared with 6%), the largest study of its kind has found.

It said patients living in the most deprived areas are also twice as likely to have little or no confidence (12%) in managing their cancer compared with those in the most affluent areas (6%).

One in ten

One in 10 people (9%) with bowel cancer had little or no confidence in managing their illness when they were diagnosed.

The findings from the University of Southampton and Macmillan Cancer Support are part of the Colorectal Wellbeing (CREW) study, which is following 1,000 people with bowel cancer for five years after surgery.

A lack of confidence could mean a person feels unable to stop cancer-related pain or fatigue from interfering with their everyday lives.

Lynn Calman, who manages the CREW study, said: ‘Our study has shown confidence to manage illness is an important factor in the recovery process and it should not be ignored.’


Grimmett C et al (2017) Colorectal cancer patient’s self-efficacy for managing illness-related problems in the first 2 years after diagnosis, results from the ColoREctal Well-being (CREW) study. Journal of Cancer Survivorship. doi:10.1007/s11764-017-0636-x

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