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Public Health England to launch £15 million mental health resilience campaign

A campaign to be launched by Public Health England this autumn will focus on giving people resilience and coping skills to prevent mental health issue

Public Health England will launch a 15 million campaign this autumn designed to give people at risk of mental health problems coping and resilience skills

Mental Health Foundation head of empowerment and social inclusion David Crepaz-Keay is working on the campaign.

He told the suicide prevention conference at the University of Salford on February 1 that it will differ from classic public campaigns where we will be presenting evidence-based interventions around protective factors and keeping people away from common mental health disorders.

Protective factors

Protective factors against suicide can include sports participation, social support and employment.

Dr Crepaz-Keay said the campaign will be aimed at people who are at high risk of depression, anxiety, low mood and sleep disorders, actively giving them the skills to help themselves and each other stay out of those areas and improve resilience

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Public Health England will launch a £15 million campaign this autumn designed to give people at risk of mental health problems coping and resilience skills


Picture: iStock

Mental Health Foundation head of empowerment and social inclusion David Crepaz-Keay is working on the campaign.

He told the suicide prevention conference at the University of Salford on February 1 that it will differ from ‘classic public campaigns where we will be presenting evidence-based interventions around protective factors and keeping people away from common mental health disorders’. 

Protective factors

Protective factors against suicide can include sports participation, social support and employment. 

Dr Crepaz-Keay said the campaign will be aimed at people who are at high risk of depression, anxiety, low mood and sleep disorders, ‘actively giving them the skills to help themselves and each other stay out of those areas and improve resilience and coping skills’. 

He added: ‘I am working on shifting the emphasis from clinical treatment of symptoms, to what can people do to help themselves and each other stay out of our already stretched-to-bursting-point services.’

More from the suicide prevention conference

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