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Patients with cancer face inadequate care due to NHS pressures, Macmillan survey shows

A Macmillan and nfpSynergy survey showed that 52% of nurses and GPs have concerns about cancer care. 

Nurses and GPs working in UK primary care are not confident the NHS workforce is able to provide adequate care to cancer patients due to current pressures, a survey has revealed.

The Macmillan Cancer Support and nfpSynergy survey of 257 nurses and GPs working in primary care found that over half have concerns about the level of care the is NHS providing to cancer patients.

The report also found that 37% of respondents said that existing workforce pressures meant that some cancer patients are attending emergency departments because they cant get help elsewhere.

Patient support

A total of 44% said that pressures meant cancer patients were not always being treated as early as they should be and one third reported that cancer

Nurses and GPs working in UK primary care are not confident the NHS workforce is able to provide adequate care to cancer patients due to current pressures, a survey has revealed.


Concerned about the levels of care provided by the NHS have been raised in a new report
Picture: iStock

The Macmillan Cancer Support and nfpSynergy survey of 257 nurses and GPs working in primary care found that over half have concerns about the level of care the is NHS providing to cancer patients.

The report also found that 37% of respondents said that existing workforce pressures meant that some cancer patients are attending emergency departments because they can’t get help elsewhere. 

Patient support

A total of 44% said that pressures meant cancer patients were not always being treated as early as they should be and one third reported that cancer patients do not have the support they need to regain a good quality of life after treatment.

Macmillan cancer support chief executive Lynda Thomas said: ‘The story of NHS cancer care in 2017 so far is one of unrelenting pressure, and it is now clear that many hardworking doctors and nurses are seriously concerned about how the health service is coping with the pressures placed on it.

Urgent needs

‘Attending A&E because they can’t get help elsewhere or waiting too long for treatment should be a rare event for someone being treated for cancer, but this research suggests this could be becoming worryingly routine.’

Ms Thomas maintained there was an ‘urgent need’ to address the pressures and a renewed vision for the cancer workforce.

Further information

From the Frontline: Workforce Pressures in the NHS


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