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Our marathon effort for Cancer Research UK – because we see where the money goes

Addenbrooke’s cancer nurse specialists get ready for fundraiser as charity faces income drought
Jill Barker, Charlotte Granville-George and Lucy MacDonald of Addenbrookes, wearing t-shirts that read Race For Life

Addenbrookes cancer nurse specialists get ready for fundraiser as charity faces income drought

Cancer nurse specialists will walk a marathon to raise funds for Cancer Research UK.

Jill Barker, Charlotte Granville-George and Lucy MacDonald, who work in the acute oncology service at Addenbrookes Hospital in Cambridge, will walk 26 miles over two days starting on Saturday 26 September.

Charities have watched their income dry up during the pandemic

The fundraising organisation, A Very 2020 Race for Life , challenges participants to walk, jog or run five kilometres, or just over three miles.

But the

Addenbrooke’s cancer nurse specialists get ready for fundraiser as charity faces income drought


Lucy MacDonald, Jill Barker and Charlotte Granville-George are gearing up for their marathon walk

Cancer nurse specialists will walk a marathon to raise funds for Cancer Research UK.

Jill Barker, Charlotte Granville-George and Lucy MacDonald, who work in the acute oncology service at Addenbrooke’s Hospital in Cambridge, will walk 26 miles over two days starting on Saturday 26 September.

Charities have watched their income dry up during the pandemic

The fundraising organisation, A Very 2020 Race for Life, challenges participants to walk, jog or run five kilometres, or just over three miles.

But the Addenbrooke’s trio have decided to make their effort a marathon, to raise a target of £1,445 for cancer research.

Many UK charities have seen a drop in income during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Cancer Research UK is expecting a £160 million fall in income and a £44 million cut to research funding.

Personal as well as professional factors are spurring the nurses on

Ms Barker is currently supporting her stepmother who has pancreatic cancer and her father, who has with bladder cancer.

She said: ‘In my job I can see where funding goes, not only in patient care but also in research.

‘It has been quite a tough year for everyone and it’s nice to try and give something back especially for a charity like Cancer Research UK, which has had a massive drop in income,’ she said.

‘Finding a cure takes time’

Ms MacDonald is walking in honour of her aunt, who was recently diagnosed with brain cancer.

She said it is important fundraising for research continues.

‘A poignant example is coronavirus because, even with modern day technology and fantastic scientists across the world, we can’t immediately come up with a cure. These things take time and that’s the same for cancer.’

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