News

Nurse who almost died after developing sepsis plans trip of a lifetime

A nurse who lost both legs and an arm after developing sepsis is preparing for globe-trotting adventures following her recovery.
WNS_280317_Jayne_Carpenter_Sepsis_02.JPG

A nurse who lost both legs and an arm after developing sepsis is preparing for globe-trotting adventures following her recovery.

Jayne Carpenter, from Merthyr Tydfil, South Wales, had the life-threatening condition after developing a cough that led to pneumonia.

Ms Carpenter, who worked in the orthopedic assessment unit at the Royal Gwent Hospital, Newport, is planning a holiday to Asia a year after becoming ill.

She was put on a ventilator and heavily sedated for nine weeks after developing sepsis, a complication of an infection that can lead to multiple organ failure and death. Around 44,000 people a year in the UK are believed to die from the condition.

'Lucky to be alive'

Surgeons had to perform a triple amputation and remove four fingers to save her life.

A nurse who lost both legs and an arm after developing sepsis is preparing for globe-trotting adventures following her recovery.


Jayne and Rob Carpenter are determined to travel. Picture: Wales News Service

Jayne Carpenter, from Merthyr Tydfil, South Wales, had the life-threatening condition after developing a cough that led to pneumonia.

Ms Carpenter, who worked in the orthopedic assessment unit at the Royal Gwent Hospital, Newport, is planning a holiday to Asia a year after becoming ill.

She was put on a ventilator and heavily sedated for nine weeks after developing sepsis, a complication of an infection that can lead to multiple organ failure and death. Around 44,000 people a year in the UK are believed to die from the condition.

'Lucky to be alive'

Surgeons had to perform a triple amputation and remove four fingers to save her life.

Initially coming to terms with the surgery was difficult, said Ms Carpenter, who had more than 25 years of nursing experience.  

'I could not wash, feed, walk, make myself a drink or even sit up on my own,' she said. 'It was hard. Very hard to accept the new me.'

Ms Carpenter, who is able to walk on prosthetic legs, said she feels 'lucky to be alive'.

Second chance

Now she and her husband Rob are planning new far-flung trips.

'We are both determined that my disability won't stop us travelling. Vietnam and Cambodia are next on our list,' she said.

'I want to go everywhere we can. I am looking forward to taking our campervan down the beach and going for a long, long walk with our dog Harriet in the sunshine. I am determined to make the most of every single second of each day.'

Rob said: 'We're lucky to have a second chance. A lot of people who have had sepsis don't have it.'


In other news

Sign up to continue reading for FREE

OR

Subscribe for unlimited access

Enjoy 1 month's access for £1 and get:

  • Full access to nursing standard.com and the Nursing Standard app
  • Monthly digital edition
  • RCNi Portfolio and interactive CPD quizzes
  • RCNi Learning with 200+ evidence-based modules
  • 10 articles a month from any other RCNi journal

This article is not available as part of an institutional subscription. Why is this?

Jobs