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Nurse retires after almost six decades working for the NHS

Nurse Shirley Hannan has retired after 57 years working for the NHS.
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A nurse who started her career on her 16th birthday has retired after working for the NHS for nearly six decades.

Shirley Hannan, 72, one of the longest-serving members of staff at Bradford Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, signed up as a cadet nurse with the former Bradford Fever Hospital in 1960.

Ms Hannan became a nursing student at St Lukes School of Nursing, graduating to staff nurse in 1966 on the acute medical wards at St Lukes Hospital. She then became a student midwife in the hospitals maternity unit.

She served as a ward sister for 18 years, from 1967 to 1985, when she became a project manager for individualised patient care and the introduction of nursing records across the whole of the Bradford district. She then became a senior nurse manager.

A nurse who started her career on her 16th birthday has retired after working for the NHS for nearly six decades.

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Shirley Hannan started nursing at the age of 16.

Shirley Hannan, 72, one of the longest-serving members of staff at Bradford Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, signed up as a cadet nurse with the former Bradford Fever Hospital in 1960.

Ms Hannan became a nursing student at St Luke’s School of Nursing, graduating to staff nurse in 1966 on the acute medical wards at St Luke’s Hospital. She then became a student midwife in the hospital’s maternity unit.

She served as a ward sister for 18 years, from 1967 to 1985, when she became a project manager for individualised patient care and the introduction of nursing records across the whole of the Bradford district. She then became a senior nurse manager.

Legacy

Ms Hannan has played a leading role in a number of key NHS projects, including Project 2000.

As an education and training manager, Ms Hannan worked towards the trust becoming an accredited centre to deliver a management training programme with the Open University and the Institute of Health Service Management, as well as to become an Investors in People organisation.

In 1998 Ms Hannan attended a garden party at Buckingham Palace to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the founding of the NHS.

She stopped full-time work in 2002, but continued to work two days a week, setting up a small department looking after training and staff development for the trust’s facilities staff.

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Shirley Hannan (standing on right) pictured with other cadet nurses
soon after the start of her career.

She said: ‘I have loved my time in the NHS and seen many changes.

'When I first started work, it was a 44-hour working week and my first pay was £14 per month.’

She added: ‘I have so many happy memories, and my time with Bradford hospitals has brought me many lovely friends and colleagues, who have been a constant source of support throughout my time here. I shall really miss them – although I will be keeping in touch.’

Bradford Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust chief nurse Karen Dawber said: ‘I would personally like to thank Shirley for her enormous commitment, enthusiasm and the support she has brought to the trust during her many years here, and for the legacy she will be leaving behind.’


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