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Nurse helps create asthma film for children

A respiratory nurse consultant has worked on a two-minute video aimed at encouraging children to use their inhalers properly.
Asthma film

A respiratory nurse consultant has worked on a two-minute video aimed at encouraging children to use their inhalers properly.

University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust trustee and respiratory nurse consultant Jane Scullion, together with Education for Healths chief executive Monica Fletcher, penned the story Jack Blows His Own Trumpet.

Written in verse, it tells the story of Jack who is diagnosed with asthma and given an inhaler.

However, his dream of playing the trumpet seems scuppered as he has no idea how to use the inhaler properly.

After seeing his friend Monica, who also has asthma, playing in a band, he seeks the help of a nurse who shows him what to do.

30th anniversary

The film will mark Education for Health's 30th anniversary and has been released to coincide with World Asthma Day on 2 May.

Health

A respiratory nurse consultant has worked on a two-minute video aimed at encouraging children to use their inhalers properly.



University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust trustee and respiratory nurse consultant Jane Scullion, together with Education for Health’s chief executive Monica Fletcher, penned the story Jack Blows His Own Trumpet.

Written in verse, it tells the story of Jack who is diagnosed with asthma and given an inhaler.

However, his dream of playing the trumpet seems scuppered as he has no idea how to use the inhaler properly.

After seeing his friend Monica, who also has asthma, playing in a band, he seeks the help of a nurse who shows him what to do.

30th anniversary

The film will mark Education for Health's 30th anniversary and has been released to coincide with World Asthma Day on 2 May.

Health professionals, teachers, parents and children’s activity leaders will be encouraged to share the film with children with asthma.

Managing asthma

In a joint statement, the authors of the story said: 'Sadly, we know far too many children with asthma, a serious medical condition, are reluctant, or unable, to use their inhalers properly and this can have a huge impact on their lives.

'Many miss out unnecessarily on enjoying important everyday activities such as sport or music. This is unacceptable and often unnecessary if their asthma is managed properly.'


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