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Nurse back at work thanks to bionic hand

A staff nurse who had her arm amputed due to a genetic condition is back at work after having a bionic hand fitted by surgeons at her hospital trust.
Liz_Wright_&_Mobility_&_Spec_Rehab_Centre_Team.jpg

A staff nurse who had her arm amputated due to a genetic condition is back at work after having a bionic hand fitted by surgeons at her hospital trust

Liz Wright has Madelungs deformity, a condition that causes pain in the arms and wrists, and meant she had to wear plaster casts to support her arm for more than 30 years.

She made the decision to have her right arm amputated after her pain worsened. This meant she could no longer continue to work as a staff nurse at the pre-operative assessment at the Royal Hallamshire Hospital in Sheffield.

Though she returned to work only 10 weeks after the operation, the cosmetic replacement she was originally fitted with meant she could only perform tasks one-handed, and her left arm

A staff nurse who had her arm amputated due to a genetic condition is back at work after having a bionic hand fitted by surgeons at her hospital trust


After having her arm amputated, Liz Wright (centre) was given a new, bionic arm.

Liz Wright has Madelung’s deformity, a condition that causes pain in the arms and wrists, and meant she had to wear plaster casts to support her arm for more than 30 years.

She made the decision to have her right arm amputated after her pain worsened. This meant she could no longer continue to work as a staff nurse at the pre-operative assessment at the Royal Hallamshire Hospital in Sheffield.

Though she returned to work only 10 weeks after the operation, the cosmetic replacement she was originally fitted with meant she could only perform tasks one-handed, and her left arm was tiring.

True-to-life functions 

A month later surgical colleagues at Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust fitted Ms Wright with a bionic hand able to replicate all the functions of a normal hand.

The hand is anatomically accurate and designed to provide the most true-to-life movements enabling her to perform tasks with her prosthetic hand.

It uses sensors which are triggered by muscle movements that connect to each finger and mimic the functions of a real hand.

Back to work 

With her new arm, and with the help of the trust’s mobility and rehabilitation unit, she is back at work.

Ms Wright said: ‘I can’t praise the trust enough for the excellent work they have done with my amputation, my bionic arm and ultimately getting me back to work which has always been my main aim.

‘This has allowed me to continue in a job I am passionate about and as I am aware, I am the only working nurse with a bionic arm. It is fantastic to be back in my uniform.’


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