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Neurorehabilitation: nurse training programme calls for educational partner

The course, launched by Game of Thrones star Emilia Clarke, will enhance specialist skills

The course, launched by Game of Thrones star Emilia Clarke, will enhance specialist skills


Emilia Clarke speaking at the RCNi Nurse Awards ceremony in July. Picture: Barney Newman

A programme to train more nurse specialists in neurorehabilitation, which is backed by Game of Thrones star and RCN ambassador Emilia Clarke, has reached one step further in its development.

When she launched neurorehabilitation charity SameYou earlier this year, Ms Clarke revealed she had survived two aneurysms.

The charity, which will lead the implementation of the programme in partnership with the RCN Foundation, is now looking for an educational partner to develop and deliver the advanced practice neurorehabilitation education course.

Funding has already been secured for the master’s-level programme, which will be piloted for one year from September 2020.

The pioneering programme aims to enhance nurses’ skills and knowledge to support the mental, physical and cognitive needs of 18-40 year olds who have experienced an acquired brain injury or stroke.

Emilia Clarke said nurses ‘were there to give me support on every level’

Ms Clarke spoke at the RCNi Nurse Awards ceremony in July about the nursing care she received: ‘The nurses who helped me are the reason I was able to get back to a life I recognised.

‘They were there to give me support on every level, and to answer every question, to hold my hand, and to calm me.’

Predicted rise in stroke-associated disability


RCN Foundation director Deepa Korea. 
Picture: David Gee

Figures from the Stroke Association show that around 25% of strokes in the UK occur in adults under 65 years of age, and it is estimated there will be 50% more people living with stroke-associated disability in the UK by 2035.

RCN Foundation director Deepa Korea said: ‘The development of advanced practice nurses within the field of cognitive and intellectual disability will support leadership, innovation, research and clinical development within the care pathway.’


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