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Lobster replaces Welsh dragon on flag to highlight growing skin cancer rates

A lobster replaced the Welsh dragon on flags around Wales on St David’s Day, as part of a skin cancer awareness campaign.

A lobster replaced the Welsh dragon on flags around Wales on St Davids Day, as part of a skin cancer awareness campaign.

Around 30 sites across the country including the Cardiff Millennium Centre and Pembroke Castle are flying the adapted flags to highlight rising skin cancer rates until 10 March.

Skin cancer in Wales has risen by 53% between 2003 and 2014, according to the latest figures from Cancer Research UK.

The lobster flags are part of charity Skin Care Cymru's Don't be a Lobster campaign, which aims to encourage people to think about UV protection.

Chair Paul Thomas said: The red dragon in the Welsh flag is probably the most iconic symbol of Wales. Similarly, a lobster is one of the most well-known associations with sun burn.

Our aim is simple - to encourage people to be aware of the risks.

A lobster replaced the Welsh dragon on flags around Wales on St David’s Day, as part of a skin cancer awareness campaign.

Around 30 sites across the country – including the Cardiff Millennium Centre and Pembroke Castle – are flying the adapted flags to highlight rising skin cancer rates until 10 March.

Skin cancer in Wales has risen by 53% between 2003 and 2014, according to the latest figures from Cancer Research UK.

The lobster flags are part of charity Skin Care Cymru's Don't be a Lobster campaign, which aims to encourage people to think about UV protection.

Chair Paul Thomas said: ‘The red dragon in the Welsh flag is probably the most iconic symbol of Wales. Similarly, a lobster is one of the most well-known associations with sun burn.

‘Our aim is simple - to encourage people to be aware of the risks.’

Charity trustee and dermatologist Avad Mughal said: ‘Although Wales is often synonymous with rain, even when the sun isn't shining, the UV rays can penetrate your skin, heightening the risk of various skin cancers.’

Around 140 people die from the disease in Wales every year, with some 770 new diagnoses annually, Cancer Research UK said.


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