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Job applications soar at hospital trust after TV documentary series

A major London hospital trust which was the subject of a hit TV documentary series has seen a surge in nurses and other staff applying to work there.

A major London hospital trust which was the subject of a hit TV documentary series has seen a surge in nurses and other staff applying to work there


The hit BBC2 show Hospital has had an impact on job applications to Imperial College Healthcare 
NHS Trust, where the show is filmed. Picture: Ryan McNamar

More than two million viewers a week tuned into BBC2 show Hospital, which was filmed across London’s Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust and aired in January and February. 

47% rise

The trust has seen a 47% rise in job applications for posts across the trust, with 5,738 applications received in January this year compared to 3,908 in January 2016.

The show laid bare the highs, including pioneering treatments, and the lows – such as bed shortages – of life working in the NHS.

Trust director of nursing Janice Sigsworth told Nursing Standard: ‘Naturally I am grateful for the increase in applications for jobs, particularly as it is well known how London trusts struggle to fill nurse vacancies.

‘Anything that shows what a great place to work Imperial is, has got to be welcome. When the new recruits come on shift in the next few months it will provide yet another boost to morale.’

Second series

The hospital is currently hosting the cameras once more as filming is now underway for series two.

Professor Sigsworth added: ‘It’s been interesting having them here and my nurses found it quite exciting to be part of the series.

‘It created a real buzz and after each episode was aired we had a lot of discussions, mostly between staff from different departments who don’t normally get to see the excellent care given by their colleagues.

‘Some of our nurses like being in front of the camera, others found it a bit more tricky, but they all appreciated a chance to show people the challenges and pressures they are under in their work.

‘Obviously some featured more heavily than others, but each member got a lot of support both before and after their episode was aired to make sure they understood they would be shown.

‘We got a lot of feedback, and at no point did anyone say to me ‘why did you agree to do this (the show)?’

‘We are such a big trust, with so many specialist services including major trauma and stroke unit, that it would probably take 10 series to show it all.’


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