News

Film helps parents with cancer talk to their children about the diagnosis

University College London Hospital staff team up with film company to produce animation for parents with cancer. 
Film title

Nurses are being urged to tell parents with cancer about a short animated film that explores how to tell children of varying ages about their diagnosis.

The film is a joint project of University College London Hospital Cancer Collaborative and the Fruit Fly Collective, a group of scientists and artists who work together on health projects.

It depicts a family, and gives practical tips on what to do, including answering any questions a child might have, trying to stick to routines and being aware of childrens feelings.

The makers hope clinical nurse specialists will tell patients about the film.

Psychological support

Consultant clinical psychologist Mark Barrington said: It is so important people diagnosed with cancer receive the right psychological, as well as medical, support.

For parents, this can be an especially difficult time and sometimes people are unsure whether or

Nurses are being urged to tell parents with cancer about a short animated film that explores how to tell children of varying ages about their diagnosis.

The film is a joint project of University College London Hospital Cancer Collaborative and the Fruit Fly Collective, a group of scientists and artists who work together on health projects.

It depicts a family, and gives practical tips on what to do, including answering any questions a child might have, trying to stick to routines and being aware of children’s feelings.

The makers hope clinical nurse specialists will tell patients about the film.

Psychological support

Consultant clinical psychologist Mark Barrington said: ‘It is so important people diagnosed with cancer receive the right psychological, as well as medical, support.

‘For parents, this can be an especially difficult time and sometimes people are unsure whether or not to tell their children about their diagnosis at all.’

Fruit Fly Collective director Caroline Leek said: ‘When creating this film, we wanted to produce something that was accessible to every cancer patient, regardless of their cultural background, or level of health literacy.’

Age-awareness

Ginny Ludlow, who was diagnosed with cancer ten years ago, said the film would have been helpful to her.

‘My children were at such different stages of their lives and the film talks you through how different age groups might react and process information,’ she said.

Watch the film here

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