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COVID-19: Northern Ireland rewards final-year students for working during pandemic

Health minister extends band 4 pay until their nursing studies end in September
Disinfecting surfaces at the Covid-19 recovery ward at Mater Hospital, Belfast

Health minister extends band 4 pay until their nursing studies end in September

Final-year nursing students in Northern Ireland who worked during the COVID-19 pandemic will continue to be paid at band 4, health minister Robin Swann has announced.

In March, students in their final year were asked if they wanted to work in response to the outbreak.

Those who chose to were paid at band 4, with the hours worked counting towards their final placement.

Band 4 pay will continue until nursing course ends

Mr Swann said that, as thanks for their efforts, the 660 students who opted to work will continue to be paid at band 4 (21,892 per year) until 30 September 2020 when their training comes to an end.

  • RELATED:

Health minister extends band 4 pay until their nursing studies end in September


Disinfecting surfaces at the Covid-19 recovery ward at Mater Hospital, Belfast. Picture: PA

Final-year nursing students in Northern Ireland who worked during the COVID-19 pandemic will continue to be paid at band 4, health minister Robin Swann has announced.

In March, students in their final year were asked if they wanted to work in response to the outbreak.

Those who chose to were paid at band 4, with the hours worked counting towards their final placement. 

Band 4 pay will continue until nursing course ends

Mr Swann said that, as thanks for their efforts, the 660 students who opted to work will continue to be paid at band 4 (£21,892 per year) until 30 September 2020 when their training comes to an end.

Usually, final-year nursing students are paid at band 3 (£19,337 per year) for this period until they take up nursing roles at band 5.

A band 5 starting salary in Northern Ireland is £24,907 a year.  

A show of gratitude for students’ hard work

Mr Swann said: ‘I commend all nursing and midwifery students for their contribution and support during the COVID-19 outbreak, and wish them well for their future careers in the health service.’

Northern Ireland’s chief nursing officer Charlotte McArdle also congratulated the students who played a role in the fight against COVID-19.

View our COVID-19 resource centre

She said she recognised that the times have been challenging, including for first-year students who had their courses paused.

‘I look forward to welcoming the new graduates to their new professions as they transition over to permanent posts in the coming months,’ she added.


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