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Clarity needed on status of EU staff working in the UK, King's Fund warns

King's Fund sets out five key issues for NHS following EU referendum result.
Work in Britain

The government must clarify if European Union nurses and other healthcare staff will be able to continue working in the NHS, think tank the King’s Fund has urged.

The King's Fund has released a document setting out five big issues for the NHS following the Brexit vote covering staffing, accessing treatment, regulation, cross-border cooperation, funding and finance.

It highlights a shortfall of staff in the health service and a particular gap in nursing, midwifery and health visiting.

There are more than 33,000 nurses and midwives from other EU countries working in the NHS.

Words of warning

The report states: ‘Given the current shortfalls being experienced in both the health and social care sectors the government must clarify its intentions on the ability of EU nationals to work in health and social care roles in the UK, not least to avoid EU staff who are currently working

The government must clarify if European Union nurses and other healthcare staff will be able to continue working in the NHS, think tank the King’s Fund has urged.

The King's Fund has released a document setting out five big issues for the NHS following the Brexit vote covering staffing, accessing treatment, regulation, cross-border cooperation, funding and finance.

It highlights a shortfall of staff in the health service and a particular gap in nursing, midwifery and health visiting.

There are more than 33,000 nurses and midwives from other EU countries working in the NHS.

Words of warning

The report states: ‘Given the current shortfalls being experienced in both the health and social care sectors the government must clarify its intentions on the ability of EU nationals to work in health and social care roles in the UK, not least to avoid EU staff who are currently working in the NHS deciding to leave to work in other countries.’

The report also warns that if the economic shock predicted by the treasury if the UK voted Brexit materialises, the implications for patients and service users could be 'profound’.

It adds that NHS employment contracts and the Agenda for Change pay framework could be affected if the government decides to change the European working time directive, which limits the maximum amount of time that employees in any sector can work to 48 hours per week.

Further information

Five big issues for health and social care after the Brexit vote

 

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