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Children’s hospital appoints nurse for syndrome triggered by COVID-19

Evelina London has seen almost 400 patients with PIMS-TS, thought to be a delayed reaction to the body trying to overcome COVID-19
Picture of nurse Michael Bell, who cares for patients with paediatric inflammatory multisystem syndrome (PIMS-TS)

Evelina London has seen almost 400 patients with PIMS-TS, thought to be a delayed reaction to the body trying to overcome COVID-19

A London children’s hospital has become one of the first to appoint a dedicated nurse for the treatment of patients with paediatric inflammatory multisystem syndrome (PIMS-TS), a condition thought to be triggered by COVID-19.

Evelina London Children’s Hospital, which was among the first to report PIMS-TS as a new syndrome in April 2020, appointed Michael Bell late last year.

He now works with a team of doctors and nurses to

Evelina London has seen almost 400 patients with PIMS-TS, thought to be a delayed reaction to the body trying to overcome COVID-19

Picture of nurse Michael Bell, who cares for patients with paediatric inflammatory multisystem syndrome (PIMS-TS)
Michael Bell cares for patients with paediatric inflammatory multisystem syndrome (PIMS-TS)

A London children’s hospital has become one of the first to appoint a dedicated nurse for the treatment of patients with paediatric inflammatory multisystem syndrome (PIMS-TS), a condition thought to be triggered by COVID-19.

Evelina London Children’s Hospital, which was among the first to report PIMS-TS as a new syndrome in April 2020, appointed Michael Bell late last year.

He now works with a team of doctors and nurses to provide care to patients and their families, and runs a dedicated helpline which gives support to the parents of children who have been discharged.

As part of his role, Mr Bell has also developed supportive leaflets, one for schools on how to support children returning to the classroom and one for parents of children hospitalised with the condition.

Children with the condition require hospital treatment but if detected early it can be successfully treated

Mr Bell said: ‘As PIMS-TS is a new condition, I help families understand it and the symptoms their child has during and after their hospital stay. Often this can be the first time their child has needed hospital treatment, so it can be a worrying time for them.

‘I provide care and reassurance to families during their hospital stay, coordinate follow-up care in outpatient clinics and run a dedicated helpline.’

PIMS-TS is thought to be a delayed reaction to the body trying to overcome COVID-19. It causes swelling throughout the body as well as symptoms including a fever, stomach ache, diarrhoea, vomiting, a rash, red bloodshot eyes, a strawberry red tongue or red cracked lips.

Those who have the condition will require hospital treatment, but if detected early it can be successfully treated. The hospital, part of Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust, has seen almost 400 patients with the condition since it was discovered.

Mr Bell said: ‘The children and young people we’ve seen with PIMS-TS have responded well to hospital treatment and we continue to monitor them through regular check-ups afterwards. It’s great seeing my patients at their outpatient follow-up appointments when they’ve made a good recovery.’


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