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Almost half of women with breast cancer unsure where to turn once treatment ends

Nearly half of women diagnosed with breast cancer say they were not told how to access proper support once their treatment was over.
Breast cancer care

Nearly half of women diagnosed with breast cancer say they were not told how to access proper support once their treatment was over.

Left in the dark

New findings from the charity Breast Cancer Care show 42% of the 800 women surveyed were unsure where to turn once they no longer needed hospital care.

More than half (53%) admitted they had struggled with anxiety and nearly a third (31%) with depression.

Just over a quarter (26%) claimed that completing their treatment was harder than having a breast removed or going through chemotherapy or radiotherapy.

The results have led the charity to warn that women are being left in the dark at a crucial time in their recovery.

Other findings included:

  • Only one in ten patients said they felt positive and ready to move on after being discharged.
  • 80% feared their

Nearly half of women diagnosed with breast cancer say they were not told how to access proper support once their treatment was over.

Left in the dark

New findings from the charity Breast Cancer Care show 42% of the 800 women surveyed were unsure where to turn once they no longer needed hospital care.

More than half (53%) admitted they had struggled with anxiety and nearly a third (31%) with depression.

Just over a quarter (26%) claimed that completing their treatment was harder than having a breast removed or going through chemotherapy or radiotherapy.

The results have led the charity to warn that women are being left in the dark ‘at a crucial time in their recovery’.

Other findings included:

  • Only one in ten patients said they felt positive and ready to move on after being discharged.
  • 80% feared their cancer would return.
  • 79% experienced fatigue.
  • One in two lacked confidence in how their body looked

Anxiety and isolation

Breast Cancer Care clinical nurse specialist Jane Murphy said: ‘For many women, having regular hospital appointments and interaction with their breast care team is hugely beneficial and reassuring.

‘So when treatment ends, it can feel like a security blanket being pulled away, which can lead to feelings of anxiety and isolation.

‘Time and resources are constantly strained, and this is where Breast Cancer Care can help.’

Help from Breast Cancer Care

Ms Murphy recommends nurses consider referring patients to the charity’s Moving Forward course and resource pack.

It has also launched a Breast Cancer Care app which offers women instant access to support from the moment they finish treatment for as long as they need it.


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