Journal scan

Women in deprived areas have increased risk of coronary heart disease

Women living in more deprived areas of the UK and with lower levels of education have a greater risk of developing coronary heart disease, new research suggests 
bad

Women living in more deprived areas of the UK and with lower levels of education have a greater risk of developing coronary heart disease, new research suggests.

Researchers from the University of Oxford studied 1.2 million women taking part in the Million Women Study. They looked at four lifestyle factors: smoking, alcohol consumption, physical activity and body mass index.

More than 900,000

The number of women in the UK living with coronary heart disease. It kills more than twice as many women as breast cancer every year.

[ Source: British Heart Foundation ]

During the 12-year follow-up period, 72,000 women developed heart disease. The researchers found that, without taking into account the four lifestyle factors, women who had completed compulsory schooling with no qualifications had almost twice

...

Women living in more deprived areas of the UK and with lower levels of education have a greater risk of developing coronary heart disease, new research suggests. 


Research found health-related behaviours are often influenced
by education and deprivation. Picture: iStock 

Researchers from the University of Oxford studied 1.2 million women taking part in the Million Women Study. They looked at four lifestyle factors: smoking, alcohol consumption, physical activity and body mass index. 

More than 900,000

The number of women in the UK living with coronary heart disease. It kills more than twice as many women as breast cancer every year.

[Source: British Heart Foundation

During the 12-year follow-up period, 72,000 women developed heart disease. The researchers found that, without taking into account the four lifestyle factors, women who had completed compulsory schooling with no qualifications had almost twice the risk of developing heart disease or dying from it than women who had a degree. 

Women in the most deprived areas also had twice the risk of heart disease compared to women form the least deprived areas. After lifestyle factors were taken into account, the researchers said the risk diminished. 

‘It is important to recognise that these health-related behaviours are themselves influenced by education and deprivation, and that it is harder to change them if you don’t have the resources to do so,’ said lead study author Sarah Floud. 


Floud S et al (2016) The role of health-related behavioural factors in accounting for inequalities in coronary heart disease risk by education and area deprivation: prospective study of 1.2 million UK women. BMC Medicine. doi: 10.1186/s12916-016-0687-2

Want to read more?

Subscribe for unlimited access

Enjoy 1 month's access for £1 and get:

  • Full access to nursing standard.com and the Nursing Standard app
  • Monthly digital edition
  • RCNi Portfolio and interactive CPD quizzes
  • RCNi Learning with 200+ evidence-based modules
  • 10 articles a month from any other RCNi journal

This article is not available as part of an institutional subscription. Why is this?

Jobs