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Weight training can reduce risk of complications in people with type 2 diabetes

Just one session of interval weight training can improve blood vessel function and reduce the risk of complications in people with type 2 diabetes, say US researchers. 
Weights-iStock.jpg

Just one session of interval weight training can improve blood vessel function and reduce the risk of complications in people with type 2 diabetes, say US researchers.

They compared the effects of two types of interval training: resistance (leg press, extensions and lifts) and cardiovascular exercises (stationary bicycle) in 35 people. Study participants were split into three groups: those with type 2 diabetes, regular exercisers without diabetes and non-exercisers.

Blood vessel improvement

Each group performed a 20-minute exercise routine, which included a warm-up, and seven one-minute high-intensity exercises with a one-minute rest between each.

The researchers found that those doing exercises showed greater blood vessel function improvement after the resistance-based interval training, but this was most prominent in the type 2 diabetes group.

Individuals with type

...

Just one session of interval weight training can improve blood vessel function and reduce the risk of complications in people with type 2 diabetes, say US researchers. 


Exercises included leg presses, extensions and lifts and cycling on a
stationary bicycle. Picture: iStock 

They compared the effects of two types of interval training: resistance (leg press, extensions and lifts) and cardiovascular exercises (stationary bicycle) in 35 people. Study participants were split into three groups: those with type 2 diabetes, regular exercisers without diabetes and non-exercisers. 

Blood vessel improvement

Each group performed a 20-minute exercise routine, which included a warm-up, and seven one-minute high-intensity exercises with a one-minute rest between each. 

The researchers found that those doing exercises showed greater blood vessel function improvement after the resistance-based interval training, but this was most prominent in the type 2 diabetes group. 

‘Individuals with type 2 diabetes are up to four times more likely to develop cardiovascular disease than those without,’ they said. ‘With further study, this information could provide a new safe and cost-effective tool to help people manage their disease.’ 


Francois M et al (2016) Resistance-based interval exercise acutely improves endothelial function in type 2 diabetes. American Journal of Physiology: Heart and Circulatory Physiology. doi:10.1152/ajpheart.00398.2016

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