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Short talk with nurse trained in smoking cessation doubles quit rates

Self-reported smoking cessation rates among hospital patients more than doubled when nurses who had undergone one hour’s training coached patients on how to quit, latest findings show. 
short talk

Self-reported smoking cessation rates among hospital patients more than doubled when nurses who had undergone 1 hours training coached patients on how to quit, latest findings show.

The study of 1,528 patients in five community hospitals in Michigan, United States, looked at self-reported and lab-confirmed quit rates.

Results showed that 6 months after discharge, 16.5% of smokers from the three intervention hospitals said they had quit, compared to 5.7% from the other two hospitals.

Two-fold difference

The researchers also looked at lab-confirmed quit rates based on urine tests and found a two-fold difference among patients from intervention hospitals, but that data was not considered statistically significant.

Nurses at the intervention hospitals received 1-hour training on strategies to help smokers quit, such as identifying triggers

...

Self-reported smoking cessation rates among hospital patients more than doubled when nurses who had undergone 1 hour’s training coached patients on how to quit, latest findings show. 


Nurses at intervention hospitals received an hour's training on
strategies to help smokers quit. Picture: Alamy

The study of 1,528 patients in five community hospitals in Michigan, United States, looked at self-reported and lab-confirmed quit rates.

Results showed that 6 months after discharge, 16.5% of smokers from the three intervention hospitals said they had quit, compared to 5.7% from the other two hospitals. 

Two-fold difference 

The researchers also looked at lab-confirmed quit rates based on urine tests and found a two-fold difference among patients from intervention hospitals, but that data was not considered statistically significant.

Nurses at the intervention hospitals received 1-hour training on strategies to help smokers quit, such as identifying triggers and managing cravings.

They learned which quit-smoking aids, including drugs, were likely to help which type of smoker based on their addiction and past attempts at quitting. 

Short talks 

Nurses also carried a pocket card on how to help smokers quit. According to the research, nurses at intervention hospitals spent on average about 9 minutes discussing ways to quit smoking with each patient.

Nurses and other staff at the remaining two hospitals did not change their approach to caring for patients.


Duffy SA et al (2016) Effectiveness of the Tobacco Tactics Program in the Trinity Health System. American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Vol. 51, Issue 4, p551–565.

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