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Personalise education plan to improve quality of life in liver patients

Patients with alcohol-related liver disease who have a personalised education plan are more likely to self-manage their condition, suggest researchers at King’s College London.

Researchers investigating the relationship between illness belief and confidence to self-manage in patients with alcohol-related liver disease studied 159 patients who attended the liver outpatient clinics of a London hospital between October 2012 and November 2013.

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All the patients completed questionnaires to assess their illness perception, self-efficacy, quality of life and emotional state. An assessment of the patients alcohol intake and severity of their liver condition was also undertaken.

The study found that patients understanding of their condition and level of concern about their illness had a significant effect on their ability to self-manage. The researchers said healthcare practitioners should use patients perceptions of their illness to create individualised responses to meet their needs and better support self-management of their condition.

Strategies to address symptoms identified by patients are likely to improve their quality of life and confidence to self-manage, as well as reducing

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Researchers investigating the relationship between illness belief and confidence to self-manage in patients with alcohol-related liver disease studied 159 patients who attended the liver outpatient clinics of a London hospital between October 2012 and November 2013.

Picture credit: iStock

All the patients completed questionnaires to assess their illness perception, self-efficacy, quality of life and emotional state. An assessment of the patient’s alcohol intake and severity of their liver condition was also undertaken.

The study found that patients’ understanding of their condition and level of concern about their illness had a significant effect on their ability to self-manage. The researchers said healthcare practitioners should use patients’ perceptions of their illness to create individualised responses to meet their needs and better support self-management of their condition.

‘Strategies to address symptoms identified by patients are likely to improve their quality of life and confidence to self-manage, as well as reducing anxiety and depression,’ they said.

‘Information obtained from patients about their illness beliefs could be used to formulate a personalised patient education plan to support health behaviour changes.’

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