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Parents support vaccination but may not want children vaccinated for flu

Parents who generally support vaccination may doubt the necessity of an influenza vaccination for their child, research suggests.
Nasal_spray_seasonal_flu_vaccine-SPL.jpg

Parents who generally support vaccination may doubt the necessity of an influenza vaccination for their child, research suggests.

In 2014, researchers from Bristol and Wales explored parents' perceptions of influenza in children, and why they decide to accept or decline a nasal influenza vaccine for their child.

A survey of 14 questions was distributed to parents of children aged three to 11 in a primary school in Bristol. A total of 86 families responded to the questionnaire and ten parents were interviewed.

A total of 91% of parents in the survey favoured routine vaccinations but only 47% were supportive of nasal influenza vaccination.

Dispelling myths

In 2012, the UK government announced a universal annual nasal influenza vaccine programme for

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Parents who generally support vaccination may doubt the necessity of an influenza vaccination for their child, research suggests.


Less than half of the families interviewed were supportive of immunising their
children with a nasal influenza vaccination. Picture: Science Photo Library 

In 2014, researchers from Bristol and Wales explored parents' perceptions of influenza in children, and why they decide to accept or decline a nasal influenza vaccine for their child.

A survey of 14 questions was distributed to parents of children aged three to 11 in a primary school in Bristol. A total of 86 families responded to the questionnaire and ten parents were interviewed. 

A total of 91% of parents in the survey favoured routine vaccinations but only 47% were supportive of nasal influenza vaccination.

Dispelling myths 

In 2012, the UK government announced a universal annual nasal influenza vaccine programme for children from the age of two to 16, as recommended by the Joint Committee for Vaccinations and Immunisations.

The authors of the study, published in RCNi journal Nursing Children and Young People, said professionals involved in the planning and administration of the annual, universal nasal influenza vaccine should be aware that those who generally support vaccination may not necessarily intend to have their child vaccinated against influenza.

They added that healthcare professionals could help to dispel myths about how vaccines work. Herd immunity may be a decision-modifier for some parents, and this concept should be explained clearly by those providing vaccination services, the authors warned.


Moulsdale P et al (2017) Parents' perceptions of influenza and why they accept or decline the nasal vaccine for their child. Nursing Children and Young People. doi: 10.7748/ncyp.2017.e854

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