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One in three patients with hypertension 'not taking their medication'

One in three patients with hypertension 'not taking their medication'

One in three patients with high blood pressure are failing to take their medication, research suggests

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Non-adherence rose with each additional medication prescribed. Picture: Alamy

One in three patients with high blood pressure are failing to take the medication they are given to control it, research suggests.

A total of 1,400 patients with hypertension took part in the study conducted jointly by a team of researchers from the Universities of Leicester and Manchester and from the Czech Republic.

Urine samples were collected from 25 clinics and analysed using a biochemical test specifically designed by the researchers.

Results showed 41.6% of the UK cohort and 31.5% of the Czech cohort were not taking all their medication.

Least likely

Some 14.5% of the UK and 12% of the Czech patients were not taking any.

Younger patients and females were found to be the least likely to adhere to their prescriptions.

The risk of non-adherence was found to increase by 75% with each additional medication prescribed and was highest with diuretics.

Lead author Pankaj Gupta said: ‘Given the high prevalence of non-adherence, we should assess patients.

‘Particularly those on multiple antihypertensive medications or those who do not have an expected response to treatment.’


Gupta P et al (2017). Risk factors for nonadherence to antihypertensive treatment. Hypertension. doi.org/10.1161/HYPERTENSIONAHA.116.08729

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