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Older people in poor health lose gripping strength faster

Older people with poorer health than their peers are more likely to have weaker muscles and experience a decline in muscle strength and gripping ability more quickly, a study shows

Older people with poorer health than their peers are more likely to have weaker muscles and experience a decline in muscle strength more quickly, a study shows.

Researchers at the University of Southampton tested the grip strength of 3,703 men and women aged 52-82 who participated in the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing.

The test was administered three times over an eight-year period.

Lack of exercise

They found that in addition to chronic diseases, being older and shorter was linked to poor strength and a faster rate of decline in gripping ability.

Those who were socioeconomically disadvantaged, did little exercise, or themselves rated their health as ‘poor’ were most likely to have less gripping strength.

Syddall H et al (2017) Correlates of Level and Loss of Grip Strength in Later Life: Findings from the English

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