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NHS cancer drugs fund: not good value for patients

The NHS Cancer Drugs Fund (CDF) was not good value for patients or society and may have led to unnecessary side effects, researchers have found.
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The NHS Cancer Drugs Fund (CDF) was not good value for patients or society and may have led to unnecessary side effects, researchers have found.

The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and King’s College London looked at 29 drugs that had been approved for use by the CDF in January 2015.

These drugs were for the treatment of 47 cancer conditions or indications. Of these indications, only 18 (38%) were based on clinical trials that reported a statistically significant benefit from the drugs, in terms of patients’ overall survival.

The study found the average overall survival benefit was 3.2 months.

'Unnecessary toxicities'

Researchers also highlight that the National Institute of Health and Care Excellence had rejected use of the CDF

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