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Living with spouse cuts risk of being overweight in patients with type 2 diabetes

Patients with type 2 diabetes who live with their spouse have half the risk of being overweight compared to single patients with type 2 diabetes, new research suggests. 
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Patients with type 2 diabetes who live with their spouse have half the risk of being overweight compared to single patients with type 2 diabetes, new research suggests.

In patients with type 2 diabetes, being overweight increases insulin resistance and worsens blood sugar control, and metabolic syndrome increases the risk of cardiovascular disease.

Previous studies have shown that living with a spouse improves blood sugar control, but the effects on overweight status and metabolic syndrome are unclear.

Between June 2010 and March 2016, researchers from Japan studied 270 patients with type 2 diabetes; 180 were married and living with their spouse and 90 patients were single.

Compared to the single group, those who were married had a significantly lower body

...

Patients with type 2 diabetes who live with their spouse have half the risk of being overweight compared to single patients with type 2 diabetes, new research suggests. 


In a study of people with type 2 diabetes, researchers found that those who were
married were 50% less likely to be overweight.

In patients with type 2 diabetes, being overweight increases insulin resistance and worsens blood sugar control, and metabolic syndrome increases the risk of cardiovascular disease. 

Previous studies have shown that living with a spouse improves blood sugar control, but the effects on overweight status and metabolic syndrome are unclear. 

Between June 2010 and March 2016, researchers from Japan studied 270 patients with type 2 diabetes; 180 were married and living with their spouse and 90 patients were single. 

Compared to the single group, those who were married had a significantly lower body mass index, lower HbA1c levels, a lower body fat mass and a lower rate of metabolic syndrome. 

After adjusting for factors such as age, sex, diabetes duration, insulin use and exercise habits, the researchers found that the married group were 50% less likely to be overweight, but with no significant difference between the sexes. 

Among men, living with a spouse reduced the risk of metabolic syndrome by 58%, although no significant risk reduction was seen among women who lived with their spouse.  

‘These findings suggest that social supportive care is needed to help single patients with type 2 diabetes manage their body weight,’ the study authors said. 


The study results were presented at the 2016 European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) meeting in Munich, Germany, held from 12 to 16 September

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