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Largest study to date on the genetics of common testicular cancer finds four new variants

Scientists have discovered four new genetic variants associated with an increased risk of testicular cancer.

The study of more than 25,000 men, led by a team at Londons Institute of Cancer Research, is the largest to date on the genetics of testicular germ cell tumours, the most common cancer in young men. It was funded by the Movember Foundation, The Institute of Cancer Research and Cancer Research UK.

Researchers identified the four new variants by analysing the DNA of 6,059 patients with testicular cancer, and comparing this with the DNA of 19,094 men without the disease. This brings to 25 the total number of genetic variants known to be associated with testicular cancer.

The researchers said that testing for the four new variants, combined with the 21 previously identified using genetic sequencing, identified men with a ten-fold increased risk of testicular cancer compared to the population average.

Institute of Cancer Research senior researcher Clare Turnbull said: In the future, if we can

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The study of more than 25,000 men, led by a team at London’s Institute of Cancer Research, is the largest to date on the genetics of testicular germ cell tumours, the most common cancer in young men. It was funded by the Movember Foundation, The Institute of Cancer Research and Cancer Research UK.

Researchers identified the four new variants by analysing the DNA of 6,059 patients with testicular cancer, and comparing this with the DNA of 19,094 men without the disease. This brings to 25 the total number of genetic variants known to be associated with testicular cancer.

The researchers said that testing for the four new variants, combined with the 21 previously identified using genetic sequencing, identified men with a ten-fold increased risk of testicular cancer compared to the population average.

Institute of Cancer Research senior researcher Clare Turnbull said: ‘In the future, if we can identify more of the genetic variation underlying testicular cancer, this sort of testing might be used clinically to help identify those at most risk of testicular cancer before they develop the disease, such that we can offer measures to help stop them from developing testicular cancer.’

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