Journal scan

Hip fractures associated with increased risk of dying in older people

Older people who experience a hip fracture have an increased risk of dying both immediately after the fracture and in the longer term, say researchers. 

Older people who experience a hip fracture have an increased risk of dying both immediately after the fracture and in the longer term, say researchers. 


In people aged 60 and over who had experienced a hip fracture at least eight years previously,
the study showed an almost two-fold increased risk of death. Picture: iStock

They analysed eight studies from Europe and the US involving 122,808 people aged 60 years and older, who were followed up for an average of 12 years. During this time, 4,273 hip fractures occurred and there were 27,999 deaths. 

Two-fold increased risk

The researchers found that although the risk of death was highest in the first year after the hip fracture, there was also an almost two-fold increased risk of dying eight years or more after the hip fracture had occurred. 

‘It is important to implement appropriate measures to prevent the occurrence of hip fractures, while more attention should be given to those older individuals that have already experienced a hip fracture in order to ensure better quality of life and survival in the elderly,’ said lead study author Michail Katsoulis. 


Katsoulis M et al (2017) Excess mortality after hip fracture in elderly persons from Europe and the USA: the CHANCES project. Journal of Internal Medicine. doi: 0.1111/joim.12586

This article is for subscribers only

Jobs