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Heart surgery in afternoon less risky due to body clock

Patients who have open heart surgery in the afternoon could be at less risk of adverse effects than those who have morning operations, due to the body's internal clock, researchers say.

Patients who have open heart surgery in the afternoon could be at less risk of adverse effects than those who have morning operations, due to the body's internal clock, researchers say.

The body clock, or circadian rhythm, regulates when people feel the need to eat, sleep or wake up.

A study in The Lancet found nearly 300 genes linking the body clock to heart damage.

Major cardiac events

It also identified a link between a person’s body clock, their risk of heart damage and major events such as heart attacks after heart surgery.

Researchers looked at the medical records of 596 people who had heart valve replacement surgery, half in the morning and half in the afternoon.

They checked for any major cardiac events such as a heart attack, heart failure or death from

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