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Extra insulin after meal may curb cardiovascular disease in type 1 diabetes

People with type 1 diabetes may be protected from cardiovascular disease by an additional injection of insulin three hours after eating, research suggests.
insulin

People with type 1 diabetes may be protected from cardiovascular disease by an additional injection of insulin three hours after eating, according to research.

A small trial at the National Institute for Health Researchs Newcastle Clinical Research Facility found that the additional injection allows better regulation of blood sugar level and reduces fat and inflammatory markers in the blood.

Ten men with type 1 diabetes ate three meals with identical carbohydrate and protein content.

One meal had a low fat content and two had a high fat content.

3.8 million

people in England are estimated to have diabetes, with about 90% being type 2.

Source: Public Health England.

With the low fat meal, the volunteers administered their insulin dose as

...

People with type 1 diabetes may be protected from cardiovascular disease by an additional injection of insulin three hours after eating, according to research.

diabetes
An extra insulin shot might prevent cardiovascular disease
in people with type 1 diabetes. Picture: iStock

A small trial at the National Institute for Health Research’s Newcastle Clinical Research Facility found that the additional injection allows better regulation of blood sugar level and reduces fat and inflammatory markers in the blood.

Ten men with type 1 diabetes ate three meals with identical carbohydrate and protein content.

One meal had a low fat content and two had a high fat content. 

3.8 million

people in England are estimated to have diabetes, with about 90% being type 2.

Source: Public Health England. 

With the low fat meal, the volunteers administered their insulin dose as normal, calculated by the carbohydrate levels in the food.

They did the same after one high fat meal, but with the other high fat meal they also administered a further insulin injection of one-third of the original dose, three hours after eating. 

Researchers found that after the high fat meal and the standard insulin injection, sugar, fat and inflammatory markers in the blood were significantly elevated six hours after eating.

However, when the extra insulin shot was taken, the blood analysis showed normal levels of sugar, fat and inflammatory markers, similar to after the low-fat meal.


Campbell M et al (2017), An additional bolus of rapid-acting insulin to normalise postprandial cardiovascular risk factors following a high-carbohydrate high-fat meal in patients with type 1 diabetes: A randomised controlled trial. Diabetes and Vascular Disease Research.  doi:10.1177/1479164117698918

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