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Eating advice for children helps parents’ diets

Nutrition advice given to children can also improve parents’ diets, according to scientists who say findings from the ongoing study could be used to plan public health counselling programmes.
diet

Nutrition advice given to children can also improve parents diets, according to scientists who say findings from the ongoing study could be used to plan public health counselling programmes

Nutrition advice given to children can also improve parents diets, an ongoing study has revealed.

The Special Turku Coronary Risk Factor Intervention Project (STRIP) included 1,107 infants and their parents recruited from well-baby clinics in Turku, Finland, between 1989 and 1992, and split into intervention and control groups.

It aimed to decrease saturated fat intake and improve the cardiovascular health of children by recommending foods rich in unsaturated fat.

New analysis of STRIP data examined whether parents benefited from the advice.

The intervention group received dietary counselling from a nutritionist at least once a year

...

Nutrition advice given to children can also improve parents’ diets, according to scientists who say findings from the ongoing study could be used to plan public health counselling programmes

diet
A link was found between counselling and decreased saturated fat
intake by parents. Picture: Science Photo Library

Nutrition advice given to children can also improve parents’ diets, an ongoing study has revealed. 

The Special Turku Coronary Risk Factor Intervention Project (STRIP) included 1,107 infants and their parents recruited from well-baby clinics in Turku, Finland, between 1989 and 1992, and split into intervention and control groups.

It aimed to decrease saturated fat intake and improve the cardiovascular health of children by recommending foods rich in unsaturated fat.

New analysis of STRIP data examined whether parents benefited from the advice.

The intervention group received dietary counselling from a nutritionist at least once a year from eight months to 20 years old.

Counselling link

Counselling was first given to the parents, and then directly to the child when they reached age seven.

Scientists have now linked the counselling and decreased saturated fat intake for parents.

In addition, counselling tended to decrease serum total (blood with no clotting protein) and LDL concentrations ('bad' cholesterol) in intervention mothers compared with control mothers. There was a similar trend in fathers, though it was not statistically significant.

Lead author Johanna Jaakkola said: ‘Our study emphasises that long-term dietary counselling directed at children may be an efficient way to also improve the diets of parents. These findings could be used to plan public health counselling programmes.’


Jaakkola J et al (2017) Longitudinal child-oriented dietary intervention: Association with parental diet and cardio-metabolic risk factors. The Special Turku Coronary Risk Factor Intervention Project. European Journal of Preventive Cardiology. doi: 10.1177/2047487317720286

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