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E-cigarettes associated with higher rate of smoking cessation

Growth in the use of e-cigarettes in England is linked with higher rate of successful attempts to stop smoking, say UK researchers.

Growth in the use of e-cigarettes in England is associated with higher rate of successful attempts to stop smoking, say UK researchers

In 2015, the use of e-cigarettes may have helped about 18,000 people to give up smoking, new study results suggest.

Researchers at University College Londons (UCL) Health Behaviour Research Centre analysed data from the Smoking Toolkit study which provides information on smoking and smoking cessation in England and data on the percentage of smokers who set a quit date with stop smoking services.

Data were collected on 43,000 smokers between 2006 and 2015.

The researchers found that although there was no evidence that e-cigarettes prompted more people to try and quit (because more people used e-cigarettes during this time period), more people successfully quit smoking during the period.

The researchers say the study results contradict

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Growth in the use of e-cigarettes in England is associated with higher rate of successful attempts to stop smoking, say UK researchers 


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In 2015, the use of e-cigarettes may have helped about 18,000 people to give up smoking, new study results suggest.

Researchers at University College London’s (UCL) Health Behaviour Research Centre analysed data from the Smoking Toolkit study – which provides information on smoking and smoking cessation in England – and data on the percentage of smokers who set a quit date with ‘stop smoking’ services.

Data were collected on 43,000 smokers between 2006 and 2015.

The researchers found that although there was no evidence that e-cigarettes prompted more people to try and quit (because more people used e-cigarettes during this time period), more people successfully quit smoking during the period.

The researchers say the study results contradict the hypothesis that an increase in population use of e-cigarettes undermines quitting in general.

Study author Robert West, professor of health psychology at UCL, said: ‘England is sometimes singled out as being too positive in its attitude to e-cigarettes. These data suggest that our relatively liberal regulation of e-cigarettes is probably justified.’


Beard E et al (2016) Association between electronic cigarette use and changes in quit attempts, success of quit attempts, use of smoking cessation pharmacotherapy, and use of stop smoking services in England: time series analysis of population trends. BMJ. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.i4645

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