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Consuming as little as two sweetened drinks every day raises men’s heart failure risk

Men who drink two or more glasses of sweetened drinks every day have an increased risk of heart failure, latest study results suggest.

Using data from Swedens national registry, researchers from Stockholms Karolinska Institutet studied 42,400 men living in Sweden between 1998 and 2010.

All of the men, who were aged between 45 and 79 when they entered the study, recorded their average consumption of 96 food and drink items over the previous year. This included daily and weekly standard servings of 200ml, or one glass, of sweetened drinks.

The researchers found that consuming at least two daily servings of sweetened drinks was associated with a 23% increased risk of developing heart failure, compared with no consumption. Further analysis to exclude all those diagnosed with heart failure in the first five years of the study showed similar results, increasing the associated risk to 25%.

The study authors said the findings could aid in heart failure risk prevention strategies, such as recommendations on improving diet. But as the research involved only

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Using data from Sweden’s national registry, researchers from Stockholm’s Karolinska Institutet studied 42,400 men living in Sweden between 1998 and 2010.

All of the men, who were aged between 45 and 79 when they entered the study, recorded their average consumption of 96 food and drink items over the previous year. This included daily and weekly standard servings of 200ml, or one glass, of sweetened drinks.

The researchers found that consuming at least two daily servings of sweetened drinks was associated with a 23% increased risk of developing heart failure, compared with no consumption. Further analysis to exclude all those diagnosed with heart failure in the first five years of the study showed similar results, increasing the associated risk to 25%.

The study authors said the findings could aid in heart failure risk prevention strategies, such as recommendations on improving diet. But as the research involved only older, white men, they cautioned that the findings may not be applicable to younger people, women and black and minority ethnic people.

‘Possible biological mechanisms linking sweetened beverage consumption with heart failure risk need to be studied carefully,’ they said.

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