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British-led research uncovers new information on brain cancer

Scientists have found 13 new genetic errors associated with an increased risk of developing glioma, the most common form of brain cancer.
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Scientists have found 13 new genetic errors associated with an increased risk of developing glioma, the most common form of brain cancer.

Scientists at The Institute of Cancer Research (ICR), London, along with colleagues in Europe and the US, led an international study of 12,496 cases of people with glioma and 18,190 people without. Their aim was to find sequence change in DNA passed on from parents that increased risk of the disease.

The researchers carried out two new genome-wide studies and combined the results with six previous studies in a meta-analysis.

Number doubled

The size of the study meant it could detect 13 previously undiscovered genetic changes that increased the risk of glioma.

These were found to affect a variety

...

Scientists have found 13 new genetic errors associated with an increased risk of developing glioma, the most common form of brain cancer.


The study aimed to find genetic sequence changes in DNA that increased 
risk of brain cancer. Picture: Science Photo Library

Scientists at The Institute of Cancer Research (ICR), London, along with colleagues in Europe and the US, led an international study of 12,496 cases of people with glioma and 18,190 people without. Their aim was to find sequence change in DNA passed on from parents that increased risk of the disease.

The researchers carried out two new genome-wide studies and combined the results with six previous studies in a meta-analysis.

Number doubled

The size of the study meant it could detect 13 previously undiscovered genetic changes that increased the risk of glioma.

These were found to affect a variety of cell functions, including nerve cell division, DNA repair, cell cycle control, protein production and inflammation.

The study doubles the total number of genetic changes associated with risk of glioma, taking it up to 26.


Richard Houlston et al (2017) Genome-wide association study of glioma subtypes identifies specific differences in genetic susceptibility to glioblastoma and non-glioblastoma tumors. Nature Genetics. doi:10.1038/ng.3823

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