My job

60 seconds with trust chief executive Jacqueline Docherty

Take opportunities as they come and be kind to people along the way, says Jacqueline Docherty. 
Jacqueline Docherty.jpg

Take opportunities as they come and be kind to people along the way, says Jacqueline Docherty

North West Healthcare NHS Trust chief executive Jacqueline Docherty has held a variety of clinical and managerial posts during a nursing career that has spanned more than 40 years, including theatre sister, senior nurse for acute services, executive director of nursing and acting chief executive at Londons Kings College Hospital. She was appointed chief executive at West Middlesex University Hospital in 2009, and has been in her current role since April 2015. In 2004, Ms Docherty was awarded a CBE for services to nursing and the NHS.

What are your main work responsibilities? I see myself as conductor of the orchestra, leading the executive team to deliver for our patients.

Who are

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Take opportunities as they come and be kind to people along the way, says Jacqueline Docherty

 


Jacqueline Docherty is chief executive
of the North West Healthcare NHS Trust. 

North West Healthcare NHS Trust chief executive Jacqueline Docherty has held a variety of clinical and managerial posts during a nursing career that has spanned more than 40 years, including theatre sister, senior nurse for acute services, executive director of nursing and acting chief executive at London’s King’s College Hospital. She was appointed chief executive at West Middlesex University Hospital in 2009, and has been in her current role since April 2015. In 2004, Ms Docherty was awarded a CBE for services to nursing and the NHS.

What are your main work responsibilities?  
I see myself as conductor of the orchestra, leading the executive team to deliver for our patients. 

Who are your clients/patients?
The trust serves three London boroughs - Harrow, Ealing and Brent - and we also treat patients from across the country and overseas. 

What do you love about your job? 
The variety, and the people you meet along the way. Also the quest to try to make things better for our patients in terms of outcome and experience. 

What do you find most difficult? 
Trying to do it all in the timescale available. The tough financial environment the NHS is currently operating in also brings challenges, but these shouldn’t stop us from seeking to improve things for our patients. 

What is your top priority at work?
Keeping our patients safe. 

How have you developed your skills in this role? 
Through learning on the job and tapping into the expertise of others. No one can do it alone, you have to work as a team and use each other’s skills and talents.

What has been your most formative career experience? 
It’s not actually mine, but my mother’s. She was a ward sister and that was the most formative experience for me growing up. She installed in me a work ethic and a desire to make things better for others.

If you hadn’t become a nurse, what would you have done instead? 
Worked in the theatre. I think the theatre is a magical place. 

What is the best lesson nursing has taught you? 
It has taught me about humanity. It is such a privilege to work with patients, and nurses can get so much back through interacting with them in a meaningful way.

What career advice would you give your younger self? 
Take opportunities as they come and be kind to people along the way.


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