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60 seconds with Royal Marsden deputy chief executive Liz Bishop

For the Royal Marsden deputy chief executive Liz Bishop, nursing is in the blood. Through her mum, a nurse and midwife, she learned that integrity and doing the right thing are at the core of good nursing practice.
Liz Bishop

For the Royal Marsden deputy chief executive Liz Bishop, nursing is in the blood. Through her mum, a nurse and midwife, she learned that integrity and doing the right thing are at the core of good nursing practice

Liz Bishop is chief operating officer and deputy chief executive of the Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust in London. After qualifying with a BSc in nursing in 1986, she worked across various disciplines before specialising in heamato-oncology. In 2005, she took up a clinical nurse consultant post at Londons Guys and St Thomas NHS Foundation Trust before moving into general management in 2009. Having previously worked at the Royal Marsden, she returned to the trust in 2010.

What are your main work responsibilities?

The day-to-day running of the Royal Marsden, including its research portfolios.

How did you get your job?

...

Liz Bishop

For the Royal Marsden deputy chief executive Liz Bishop, nursing is in the blood. Through her mum, a nurse and midwife, she learned that integrity and doing the right thing are at the core of good nursing practice 

Liz Bishop is chief operating officer and deputy chief executive of the Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust in London. After qualifying with a BSc in nursing in 1986, she worked across various disciplines before specialising in heamato-oncology. In 2005, she took up a clinical nurse consultant post at London’s Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust before moving into general management in 2009. Having previously worked at the Royal Marsden, she returned to the trust in 2010. 

What are your main work responsibilities?

The day-to-day running of the Royal Marsden, including its research portfolios. 

How did you get your job?

I’m a driven person. I have a master’s degree and a PhD, and have been given opportunities to excel.  

Who are your clients/patients?

I work closely with the trust chief executive, chief financial officer, medical director and chief nurse. I also have my own team of managers. 

What do you love about your job? 

Working with different teams; good teamwork is crucial to delivering health care.  

What do you find most difficult? 

When things go wrong; you come into health care to do good. 

How have you developed your skills in this role? 

By learning from excellent people and making the most of development opportunities. 

What has been your most formative career experience? 

Being a ward sister at the Royal Marsden. Like my current role, I had autonomy and a great team. 

If you hadn’t become a nurse, what would you have done instead? 

I started my degree at 17 and can’t remember ever wanting to do anything else. My sister is a nurse and my mum was a midwife and nurse. 

What is the best lesson nursing has taught you? 

Integrity, and doing the right thing. My mum is a strong role model – I always go above and beyond because this is the standard she set for me.

 

 

 

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