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60 Seconds with public health leader Joanne Bosanquet

Nurses and midwives need to be more digitally savvy to increase their impact, says Public Health England’s Joanne Bosanquet
joanne

Nurses and midwives need to be more digitally savvy to increase their impact, says Public Health Englands Joanne Bosanquet.

Joanne Bosanquet is deputy chief nurse for Public Health England (PHE), a role she has held for three years. She qualified in adult nursing in 1992 and started her career in anaesthetics before undertaking a degree in health studies. After gaining experience as a health visitor and modern matron she moved into health protection and became a nurse consultant.

What are your main work responsibilities?

System-wide public health nursing leadership and internal professional leadership to about 300 nurses and midwives across the country. I provide professional advice and expertise on issues related to health protection response and resilience.

How did you get your job?

I was part of an informal professional network

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Nurses and midwives need to be more digitally savvy to increase their impact, says Public Health England’s Joanne Bosanquet.


Public Health England deputy chief
nurse Joanne Bosanquet.

Joanne Bosanquet is deputy chief nurse for Public Health England (PHE), a role she has held for three years. She qualified in adult nursing in 1992 and started her career in anaesthetics before undertaking a degree in health studies. After gaining experience as a health visitor and modern matron she moved into health protection and became a nurse consultant.

What are your main work responsibilities? 

System-wide public health nursing leadership and internal professional leadership to about 300 nurses and midwives across the country. I provide professional advice and expertise on issues related to health protection response and resilience.

How did you get your job? 

I was part of an informal professional network of senior nurses in PHE and the group supported me to apply for the post. It was the most challenging interview of my career.

What do you love about your job?

There is never a dull moment – no day or even hour is the same. I have to think on my feet a lot of the time.

What do you find most difficult?

I am not the best at self-management. I say ‘yes’ a lot because of my passion and excitement. Life can become a little bit hectic.

What is your top priority at work?

I want all nurses and midwives in PHE to become much more digitally savvy. Imagine the power of 300 specialist nurses and midwives who are in virtual contact over 70 bases.

How have you developed your skills in this role?

Experiential learning, shadowing, taking risks, making and learning from mistakes and listening to others. 

What has been your most formative career experience?

I co-ran a nurse-led service for dispersed asylum-seeking families in my home town of Doncaster in 2002. It gave me a whole new sense of what’s important.

What career advice would you give your younger self?

Knuckle down at school. What you think is important now will be a distant pixellated memory in a few years.   

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